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Event Logo 2016 U.S. Olympic Team Trials - Marathon
Saturday, February 13, 2016 - Thursday, June 1, 2017
Staples Center
Los Angels, CA


Results                 Pre-Race Athlete Q&As               Post-Race Athlete Obersvations


INDIANA RESULTS  complete results (via USATF)
Women

Place

Name

Age

City

Affiliation

Time

19

Erin Vergara

34

Indianapolis, IN

 

2:41:17

30

Whitney Bevins

34

Westfield, IN

 

2:43:59

56

Anna Weber

27

Indianapolis, IN

Oiselle

2:48:42

DNF

Rebecca Boyle

25

Indianapolis, IN

 

-

DNF

Hiruni Wijayaratne

25

Evansville, In

Brooks

-


Men

Place

Name

Age

City

Affiliation

Time

26

Dustin Emerick

26

Evansville, IN

 

2:22:18

69

Jesse Davis

34

Indianapolis, IN

 

2:29:40

94

Jordan Kyle

29

Indianapolis, IN

 

2:38:20

97

Dustin Betz

26

Schnellville, IN

Indiana St.

2:42:54

DNF

Jacob Kildoo

22

South Bend, IN

 

-


POST-RACE OBSERVATIONS

JORDAN KYLE (94th place 2:38:20)
Jordan's Quck QuoteDropping out would have been the easy thing to do - likely, the healthier thing to do. Having never walked in a race before, it was strange to have to do it 6 different times during the race. Throwing in the towel just wasn't an acceptable option for me.
 
Jordan's Recap  - Thank you so much to everyone who supported my efforts in both qualifying for the Olympic Trials and for cheering for me during the race. Due to the extreme heat, the race was the most physically and mentally anguishing event I have experienced.

Approximately 215 men qualified for the Olympic Trials, 170 showed up to race, and only 105 finished the race. So, well over 50 people dropped out of the race. I am happy to say that despite how bad I felt, how dehydrated I became, and how slow I had to run to finish, I completed the 26.2 in 2:38, finishing in 95th place.

The feelings I experienced closely mirrored the inner turmoil of these often cited Shakespearian words:
 
To be, or not to be- that is the question: 
Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune 
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, 
And by opposing end them. To die, to sleep.

Dropping out would have been the easy thing to do - likely, the healthier thing to do. Having never walked in a race before, it was strange to have to do it 6 different times during the race. Throwing in the towel just wasn't an acceptable option for me.

Again, thank you to everyone. Thank you to #‎BrooksRunning and#‎HoneyStinger. Thank you to Amanda and Thomas Endicott and their beautiful family for traveling from San Diego to cheer.

Thank you to my beautiful and wonderful girlfriend Audrey for believing in me. And thank you to my loving family for everything.

I've had a great time in L.A. and will remember the event for the rest of my life.

ERIN VERGARA (19th place 2:41:17)
On her race - I am ecstatic with my finish given the conditions and I do not deal well with hot racing conditions let alone taking on the marathon in such conditions. I have suffered heat exhaustion before so already am likely to be less able to handle the heat.  Originally I was hoping/dreaming for a top 10 finish; however the field this year was stacked more than previous Olympic trials so my goal became to race smart and see what would work out in the later stages as I knew several would struggle , including myself; however was confident that I would not resort to a DNF. Sure enough I did catch a few places along the way and managed to snag a top 20 position despite a 
more than challenging last 10k. 
 
Basically I had a plan and stuck to it with minor adjustments throughout the race as needed. I made a conscience effort to get down all my fluids from the start even if I didn't feel like drinking the entire solution. I carried 2 sponges with me with the plan of wetting them down with the neutral water available to each athlete at the given fluid stations but then didn't end up using them since there were also Ice towels handed out 2xeach lap. I slowed down a bit to make sure to grab a few and held on to them for a bit for each use to eventually sucking on them near the end as the cold fluid was a bit of relief as the heat continued to affect my fatigue level near the end stages.  I started to have severe cramping in my thighs and calves, some twinges that almost stopped me in my tracks but thankfully taking fluid during the early stages I believe allowed me to relatively race a strong last 10k compared to the field. Mentally it was a grind from the go as I felt cold chills within the first stages of the race.   I was hesitant to be aggressive until I could assess how I felt at 13 miles. I made an effort to push forward mile 16-20 and then sure enough the last 6 miles were a battle with cramping. I just looked forward to my fluids and had faith I would do whatever necessary to continue to move forward. 

On what lies ahead -   I can not imagine my life without running as it has been so instrumental in shaping the person I have become and building amazing friendships that I will have forever. Im not sure yet what the future holds but confident that whatever is ahead is more than I could hope for, just like this Olympic cycle ended with a top 20 finish and more importantly a husband who is regaining his health despite sacrificing for me along the way to achieve my goals. I (we) am so blessed. 
 
ANNA WEBER (56th place 2:48:42)
Anna's Quick Quote - Overall, running in the Olympic Trials was a great learning experience.  While I'm disappointed that the race didn't turn out differently for me, I have no regrets as I put myself into a great position at the start.  For the future, I know that heat training will be necessary if I am plan to race anywhere warm!

Anna's Recap - Where to begin?   I’m sitting in the hotel room, still needing to shower, but wanting to get a handle on my thoughts.  
 
I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t disappointed, or that I hadn’t shed a few tears over what happened today.  
 
The short explanation is that I had one of two options:  get with the lead pack early and let the race unfold from there, or run extra conservatively and put myself out of contention from the beginning and hope for the best.  
 
I went with something in between - my plan was to go out in 5:50′s and see where that put me.  As it turns out, that put me right with the lead pack (hey-o, airtime on national TV!).  So, obviously, I went with it.  The problem, though, is that this wasn’t exactly my plan.  I had hoped 5:50′s would put me in the chase pack, and I would be able to move in and out freely.  After 4 or 5 miles, I knew that the pace I was running was not sustainable for me on this given day.  I dropped back, thinking that if I could slow down a few seconds per mile that I could maintain contact while running a little bit more conservatively.  
 
I ran with the chase pack for the next few miles, and felt myself fading.  I got a great boost once I took my first elite liquids, as I was very thirsty.  I looked ahead and saw a girl who had fallen off the lead pack, running in no-man’s land, and pushed ahead for her.  After another mile or so, I was enveloped by the chase pack and tried to hang on.  
 
Somewhere around 6 I took my first gel and my next water.  I don’t know where it happened, but things really started to fall apart.  bad.  I just couldn’t will my body to run as fast as I wanted to.  I was getting passed left and right, and I was really cursing myself for having gone out as fast as I did.  
 
Somewhere around 10 my hand happened to brush against my stomach and I realized it was completely dry.  I checked the rest of my body and noticed I had completely stopped sweating.  This is pretty much the opposite of what you want to have happen while you are running in the hottest Olympic Trials on record.  
 
I made the decision not to risk a heat injury or heat exhaustion and instead run as fast as I thought was safe (or my body made that decision for me.  not sure).  At this point, I was not even sure I would be able to finish at all.  
 
The rest of the race is a little bit of a blur to me.  I drank as much nuun/water as I felt I could, but I never started sweating.  My brain went between telling myself to drop out, and telling myself no, that I had to finish.  Every time I thought enough was enough, I would see a sign that someone had made for me or someone that I didn’t know when cheer.  I kept going because of that.  
 
I reached a point in the race where I got angry.  I decided that I wasn’t going to be unhappy that this wasn’t going my way.  I decided I was going to make this race MY JOURNEY and finish it how I wanted to - happy.  I waved, fist pumped, and high-fived my way through the last 6 miles.  
 
 
In the end, I finished 56th in 2:48:36.  
 
I feel like regardless of how I had chosen to run today, I was a bit between a rock and a hard place.  I likely would have run faster had I started out closer to 6:00 pace and ran what felt overly comfortable.  But, had I done that, I would have given up any chance of being in the top 10.  
 
By going out aggressively, I also gave up what potentially could have been a top-25 finish, which would have at least helped me achieve my “C” goal.  
 
I have a lot to learn still, and a lot to work on.  Everything that has happened since July has been unreal.  I think the biggest challenge up next for me is to work on racing for place.  Every race I have run since July has been based on time, and I think today threw me off a little bit.  
 
Ultimately, I finished.  There were so many points in the race where I did not think that would be possible.  The carnage on the course was insane.  By the last loop, everywhere I looked people were sitting on the side of the road.  
 
I wanted so badly to run faster.  I tried mantras, I tried positive self talk, I tried getting angry with myself… I tried everything.  Even if I could just run a few seconds per mile faster, it would be good.  Nothing was going to make these legs go any faster, though.  
 
The good news is that this isn’t the only race I will ever run.  I will come back from this and get on the track, and tackle those demons.  It was a really great experience for me to be out there, to learn, and I will do a few things differently next time.  
 
In the end, you have to remember when things didn’t go your way there are so many people who would have loved to have started today; who would have loved to have finished; who would have loved to have been there.  I have accomplished so much, and am fortunate to still have fire left to compete.  
 
There are many ways to win a marathon.  Today, I won by finishing. 
 

INDIANA ENTRIES (click the photos to read more about each of the athletes)